A lot of concern about Woody’s cash flow Dan Leberfeld

There are a lot of people very concerned with Woody Johnson’s cash flow.
Very worried.
In fact, I hear he is staying at the Econolodge in Cortland this week.
We are organizing a fundraiser for Jets owner at the Central City Grill in Cortland. Credit cards will be accepted.
Let me take my tongue out of my cheek.
This cash flow angle, probably thrown out there by Neil Schwartz, is another attempt to make the Jets look bad in their nasty contract dispute with cornerback Darrelle Revis.
Is the Jets cash flow what it was two years ago, probably not.
We saw telltale signs of some belt tightening when the team didn’t re-sign Jay Feely or James Dearth. Or when they cut five coaches from their staff after the season.
There are still empty seats and luxury boxes. The stadium still has no naming rights.
But it goes deeper than that. It’s a U.S. problem. Well actually it’s bigger than that.
In the current world economic crisis, not many companies have the cash flow they did two years ago.
There is no doubt the recession is having an impact on the Revis’ contract talks.
Just like the recession has caused New Jersey Governor Chris Christie to freeze teacher’s salaries. Or why Newark Governor Cory Booker is making a myriad of cuts in his city, just a few miles from Jets camp.
Things are bad out there, whether Revis and Neil Schwartz want to believe that or not.
So $12, $13 million a year to play cornerback in the NFL isn’t bad right now, especially being paid by a team that has a myriad of star players to take care of in the near future.
And no, the Jets don’t have cash flow problems.
The world does.